Myths of Parkinson's

Myths of Parkinson’s

Many misconceptions surround Parkinson’s Disease. Like many other conditions, these false truths can cause a delay in diagnosis and treatment, which can be devastating. Knowing the truth behind the myths of Parkinson’s can ultimately allow you to optimize your care so you can take better care of yourself. The Facts Behind the Myths of Parkinson’s  …

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Gender differences in Parkinson's Disease

Gender Differences in Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a disorder of the nervous system that progressively affects movement. PD occurs in 50% more men than women, but that’s not the only variance. Gender differences in Parkinson’s disease also affect onset age, symptoms, treatment, and more. 2 to 1   Researchers don’t know why men are affected twice as likely …

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Pandemic, presents, and Parkinson's

Pandemic, Presents, and Parkinson’s

Caring for a loved one with Parkinson’s disease (PD) during the holidays can be a stressful time. A caregiver may feel pulled in multiple directions as holiday obligations add up on top of regular duties. The holiday spirit may seem lost amongst presents, cookies, and feelings of isolation. Find time for yourself, family traditions, and …

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Caregivers Need Care Too

A family caregiver manages health emergencies, juggles appointments, and personal care of their loved ones. November is National Family Caregivers Month. This year’s theme is “Caregiving Around the Clock.” The essential role they play in others’ health and well-being is the heart of why caregivers need care too. Why Caregiving is Tough A caregiver can …

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Benefits of Memory Screening

According to the CDC, as more people live long enough to be at greater risk of dementia, the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease is estimated to quadruple by 2050. Health officials believe that the rise in numbers directly results from more people being diagnosed thanks to improved testing. Memory screens are an essential part of the …

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ALS: More Work to Do

French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot discovered Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis ((a-my-o-TROE-fik LAT-ur-ul skluh-ROE-si) or ALS. Originally, ALS was known as Charcot’s disease after the discoverer. However, in June of 1941, it became known as Lou Gehrig’s disease when the hall of famer retired from baseball shortly after his diagnosis. There is no cure for ALS, leaving more work to …

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COVID Summer Checklist for Caregivers

The risk for severe illness from COVID-19 increases with age, with older adults being the highest risk. Severe illness from COVID-19 may require hospitalization in intensive care, with a ventilator to help them breathe, or even loss of life. If you are a caretaker of an older adult, there are steps to take to keep yourself …

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Tips for Staying Safe this Summer

Prolonged exposure to excessive heat can be a problem for anyone. For older adults and those with chronic issues, the risk is even higher. Heat-related illness is a real danger and older adults need to be proactive and take the proper precautions when the temperature is above 80°.  Staying Cool When it’s too Hot It’s …

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Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month

Approximately 50 million people worldwide are living with. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or other forms of dementia. June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. The Alzheimer’s Association says that if you have a brain, you are at risk for developing AD. This is the perfect allocated time to create awareness for this public health crisis. The …

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Alzheimer’s Misconceptions

Misconceptions surround Alzheimer’s disease (AD), like many other medical conditions. Whether it helps to ease the mind or keep hope alive for those who choose to believe, the negative impacts can be more profound than anyone ever intended. Choosing to believe in these “myths” can ultimately result in delayed treatment, which can be devastating with …

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